Business & Career Uses of Linkedin – Martin Brossman

Understanding Linkedin both for business and your career, managed by Martin Brossman

Posts Tagged ‘Understanding Linkedin’

Top 10 Reasons You Should NOT be on LinkedIn

Posted by Martin Brossman on 08/09/2009

They may not need Linkedin

They may not need Linkedin

Top 10 Reasons You Should NOT be on LinkedIn – Compiled by Martin Brossman (a bit of humor and a serious message)

1. You believe someone might steal your soul if you post a photo, and before a large rain you have to add more straw to your roof.
2. You’ve faked your own death or think you ARE Elvis.
3. You dislike people, you hate business, The term ‘networking’ makes you cringe and people you haven’t met yet are evil who eat strange food and live in enemy states.
4. You don’t, nor never will, have, any reason to build your business, meet other like minded-professionals, find clients, or need a job.
5. You named any of your children for your favorite beer, you mispelled you girlfriend’s name on your Tattoo, and are annoyed by the doctor who showed you all those dirty pictures in the ink blot test.
6. You are in the witness protection program and a guy named Godfather is trying to connect to you on Linkedin to resolve some unfinished business.
7. If you divorce your wife, you are wondering if she will still be your sister.
8. You spent 10 years in jail and were never inmate of the month.
9. You have a six figure income and when you are laid off you would like to be forced to get rid of all your belongings due to lack of connections for new employment.
10. You feel other people waste time and misuse the internet, so you’ve decided not to be on at all.

Thanks for all who contributed, and if we truly offended anyone, I apologize. It was done with good intentions. There were so many great ones it was hard to choose. Maybe more to follow. You can see all of them at the original question link:
http://www.linkedin.com/answers/using-linkedIn/ULI/526241-548650

Remember: Friends make sure their Friends are on LinkedIn, if they care about them!

Special thanks to the following specific people: Thanks Judy B. Margolis, MA – Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/judymargolis2009 who inspired #2; Thanks Rob Duncan – Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/robduncan who inspired #3; Thanks Kristen Fife – Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/kmfife who inspired #4; Thanks Anthony Sutcliffe – Linkedin http://www.linkedin.com/pub/anthony-sutcliffe/4/32/5a4 who inspired #5

Martin Brossman – Success Coach/ Trainer / Auther – www.ProNetworkingOnLine.com

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Posted in Humor, Linkedin, Martin Brossman, Sales | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Understanding Linkedin for Sales Professional – Part 1

Posted by Martin Brossman on 04/23/2009

 

Look up your next contact on Linkedin

Look up your next contact on Linkedin

Last week I convinced my friend Bob of the value of using Linkedin for sales. It happened right after I saw him having lunch with John, another friend of mine. When Bob called me later to let me know that he was doing well in his new position and to make an appointment with me for continued sales coaching, I mentioned that I knew John well. I asked him if he had used Linkedin before he talked to John. Bob said no, he hadn’t. I was sitting at my computer at the time. I asked, “Did you talk about the fact that you are both big Hurricanes fans? “No, I didn’t know that,” Bob replied. Then I asked him, “Did you discuss that you both did your undergraduate work at North Carolina State University?” Again, Bob said no.”Did you tell Bob he knows your best customer, Richard Jones? Bob replied, “No, that would have been great to know, but it didn’t come up–how did you know this?” I told him I knew it because I had looked at John’s LinkedIn profile. “If you had just taken a moment before you met John to look up his Linkedin profile,” I explained to Bob, “you would know all this information and more. Also, since John posted his profile on Linkedin, it is information that he is clearly comfortable having others know, so it’s okay to mention. You could have said, ‘I looked you up on Linkedin and noticed that you are a Hurricanes Fan, or that we both went to NC State.””Now, on the other hand,” I continued, “if he looked you up on Linkedin, he would see that you had 15 connections, that your profile says you still work at the company you left two years ago, and that you don’t have a single recommendation.” “Bob,” I said, “you’ve done your best to always sell top-quality products with a personal commitment to give the best quality support to your customers. Would you want an easy way for potential customers to see your years of experience and be able to check you out before you meet? I know you have a large number of customers that would be pleased to give you a recommendation on Linkedin if you simply asked. Bob replied, “Can we include some Linkedin training along with regular sales coaching-as soon as possible?I told him to start immediately by making sure his Linkedin profile was fully filled out and to start looking up customers before meeting them. And I noted that there’s also a large amount of information available by looking up the company that many people aren’t even using, which gives info which would have traditionally cost money or a lot of research. Several key things for a sales professional about Linkedin: Start looking up companies you are involved with, including your own. Before you meet with someone see if they are on Linkedin and review their profile. Make sure that when your future customers look you up on Linkedin, current information is there that enhances understanding and trust of you. Linkedin is a valuable tool for a successful Sales Professional and offers a great deal at the free service level.

 

 

—Martin Brossman: Success Coaching & Trainer offering Social Media, Personal Branding and Linkedin training since 2006. www.ProNetworkingOnLine.comMartin@CoachingSupport.com (919) 847-4757 (Article re-printed from www.LinkingRaleighNC.com )

Posted in Career, Greg Hyer, Linkedin, Martin Brossman, Sales | Tagged: , , | 1 Comment »

Why should someone with a job spend time with Linkedin?

Posted by Martin Brossman on 01/18/2009

Keep Employment

Keep Employment - Use Linkedin! 🙂

The following are comments from members of the Linkedin community:

Note: When the commenters use the abbreviation LI, they mean Linkedin.com.  The order of the comments is based on the sequence that people answered the question in the Linkedin Answers area.  To see the original question in Linkedin go to:  http://www.linkedin.com/answers/using-linkedIn/ULI/392100-548650

From Daniel Jatovsky – http://www.linkedin.com/in/danieljatovsky
The average person will spend 7 years at one job. If you want you want your next job to be better than your present job, shouldn’t you spend time meeting people who might offer you opportunities in the future? If you do, then when the time comes to move on (whether voluntarily or not), you will have people to call, rather than starting from square one.
Anyone who thinks they have a “stable job” is kidding themselves. There’s no such thing.

But even if all you want to do on LI is increase your value as an employee, networking is a great way to do it. If you are in any sales-related field, obviously you need to prospect. But even if you aren’t, meeting new people in the same field as you offers chances to improve your skills, find new ideas, and learn about new developments in your field.
Asking why you should spend time with LinkedIn is kind of like asking why you should bother spending time with people if it’s not work-related.

From Graham McKay – http://www.linkedin.com/in/grahammckay
Business is about people and this is a great place to interact with other people… some of this may be about future job opportunities but there is much more than that (sharing experience with fellow professionals, networking with past colleagues etc).

From Laura Ward – http://www.linkedin.com/in/strategicvision
If you only used LinkedIn during the times you *think* it is benefical to you, such as when you are job hunting, then you are not networking to your fullest potential. You never know what will change in both your personal and professional at any given time – keep connected.

From Scott Diamond – http://www.linkedin.com/in/scottdiamond
Was listening to the radio this morning and the business correspondent was talking about how many people who have lost their jobs recently were philosophical about it by saying they really felt trapped in that job. I’m sure there are lots of people that have stayed in their current jobs because of fears of the economy. But a site like LinkedIn can open doors that they might not have even known about and one of them could lead to a dream job.
If that’s not enough, its always nice to reconnect with people from your past.

From Flyn Penoyer – http://www.linkedin.com/in/flynpenoyer
The socializer and casual user should be welcome on LI, but LI is a gold mine of opportunities and the person who has a job may have any number of reasons to be here — but the one obvious one would be so that they could get themselves in a position where they didn’t need the job and were completely independent.
As to what someone should do on LI one must start with some purpose.
If one comes to LI without the goal of improving one’s own situation there is not much to do beyond socializing. If one is looking for opportunities of just about any kind there are probably people here who can help to forward those objectives in any number of ways.
Networking is valuable for any intended growth, and makes little or no sense for those who are or wish to stay static.

From Mary Jo Demski, PHR – http://www.linkedin.com/in/mjdemski
I enjoy the social interaction (re-connections with old friends and establishment of new ones) as well as the opportunity to learn from my peers. Also, I don’t have a crystal ball: right now I am gainfully and happily employed, but what if (2 of the most dreaded words!) something changes down the road? At least I will have a solid network to utilize as a potential source of new employment!

From Marcelo Rahal Coutinho – http://www.linkedin.com/in/rahal
Basically because you/we never know what is going to happen “tomorrow”. LI is my default page when I open my browser. We MUST be tuned in the market movements like who is working where, etc. We never know when those people can help/ add value to us (in our carriers, recommendations, customers, etc.) And the most important thing is that we cannot use LI only when we looking for o job. In Portuguese we say “We only exist if we are remembered by people”.

From Gianluigi Cuccureddu – http://www.linkedin.com/in/gianluigicuccureddu
Networking should be part of daily life. When being stuck without a job and not having networked, someone is obviously too late.
You don’t create valuable relationships and a network overnight.

From: Mark Wayman – http://www.linkedin.com/in/markwaymanlv
Because life is about family, friends and relationships…not material possessions.
I place $100,000+ executives. Average “C” level job tenure? Two years. Over 80% of these executives find their new job via personal and professional networks.
With the current economic state, I am the most popular person in Las Vegas. Plenty of calls from people I have not heard from in two or three years asking for jobs. No thank you.
Dig the well before you need a drink. Build the bridge before you need to cross the river. The best time to plant an oak tree was 25 years ago. The second best time is today.

From: John M. O’Connor- http://www.linkedin.com/in/johnmartinoconnor
Why should someone with a job spend time with Linkedin?
As a Career Coach and Consultant, I must say that nearly everyone should view their current position as if it is in transition. In fact, most jobs and careers truly are in transition whether you know it or not.
Additionally I must say that not everyone who has job should “spend time” with Linkedin. As much as I am a proponent of Linkedin some careers and career paths may not be conducive to this network. But let’s focus on most people in a career or job.
Let me make five quick points here on this subject:
1. BUILD RELATIONSHIPS. You will benefit from building relationships with key contacts throughout your career.
2. PRACTICE GIVING. The give value first before you expect to get value seems to be heavily promoted and a part of the Linkedin culture. That principle should guide all of your networking communications.
3. BUILD USING BUILDING BLOCKS. Linkedin can literally provide contacts, then relationships then solutions to problems you are trying to solve at work or while you are working. Why not take advantage of consistent networking and relationship building?
4. INVEST NOW – FOCUS YOUR TIME. Just spending time with Linkedin Martin simply is not enough. If you are going to utilize the features then utilize the features you need to reach your specific career goals. If you gain permission and acceptance of this device when you have a job then you don’t have to panic use it if you are ever let go.
5. GET SPECIFIC. Answer the question – What has Linkedin done to help me with my career or what could it do? Find a coach, hire a professional and think about this question. Find out and apply all positive answers.

From Greg Hyer – http://www.linkedin.com/in/greghyer
This is a great question because not many people want to think about what to do when they have to start a new job search. LinkedIn can serve several purposes for someone who is looking for a job or is not but might have to by force. In the case of the person not expecting a merger to happen or cut backs to include his or her position LinkedIn is where you belong. That person can use LinkedIn to network with co-workers and keep in touch with them after they are no longer working together. Networking with co-workers is like a “gateway drug.” After that this LinkedIn user will start to expand their network beyond co-workers and join groups that meet their interests. Now this person has established their network and has it “on paper” so when it comes time to move on the transition is much easier.
On a personal note, I was told about LinkedIn by a co-worker who new I was transitioning to North Carolina. He insisted that I use this as a way to ask friends for help. He was right to suggest it and LinkedIn helped me find my current position through a connection.

From Emily Nichols – http://www.linkedin.com/in/enichols
Call me naively optimistic, but now that I’ve got a LinkedIn profile fully completed, I feel much more confident in my ability to locate a job. I’ve been fortunate enough to meet some incredible people, like Martin Brossman, Greg Hyer, Christopher Durham, and Chuck Hester–all people I may have never met without joining LinkedIn and the groups they participate in.
I think, especially in this economical climate, you would be crazy NOT to have as many career resources at your fingertips. They say you should always keep an eye and ear open to potential jobs because even if you love your job, you may find one that will lead you in a new and even better direction. Life and work are about the moments that lead us to our next great adventure–LinkedIn can guide you.
Not only is LinkedIn useful in a job hunt or meeting new business contacts, but it’s also keeping me on top of new trends. Members post bulletins about interesting marketing ideas, trends in social media, and links to informative videos and articles on the web. In reality, my LinkedIn is an educational resource.
I’ve recommended all my friends get on LinkedIn and even made it part of a branding initiative for my consulting job. I’m currently looking for a job in Raleigh so I can relocate from Boston and I feel that I’m much more well-informed on what’s out there for jobs.

From Chuck Hesterhttp://www.linkedin.com/in/chuckhester
The old adage “dig your well before your thirsty” sums it up for me. Making sure you have a network to turn to if you need them is very important, and LinkedIn is the best tool available to build that network.
As a Pay it Forward advocate, the ability to help others is also important, and again LinkedIn is amazing for making that happen.
Thanks to people like Greg Hyer and of course Martin Brossman, I enjoy a solid, deep network of professionals that I know I can turn to if I needed help.
It’s a different world than it was in 2001 during the last dotcom bubble burst and 9/11. We are all in this together and it’s important to maintain relationships in good times – and bad.
My book talks a lot about this very subject. Links: http://www.thepayitforwardchronicles.blogspot.com

From Paige Dumoulin – http://www.linkedin.com/in/paigedumoulinmedica
You already know the answer to this question. For a lot of people it’s a matter of “you don’t know what you don’t know”. They don’t see the value in it because they were too busy working. I personally do based on having been unemployed and everyone told me to “NETWORK”. YIKES!! I had no clue.
Thankfully I found this site, started utilizing the “Answer” section and made several fantastic connections….I even gained employment thru a LinkedIn Group. But the friendships I’ve made go far beyond the job search. Now I just enjoy sharing ideas and learning from others!

From Nikhil Bhatnagar – http://www.linkedin.com/in/nikhilbhatnagar
In my opinion it does not matter if you are with or with out job and are into networking like linkedin or any other. It is a platform where you can easily advertise yourself and your work. and according to me and my experience advertising does not means sales! it is generating interest and product awareness it could be you or your work.
For example : if throw a stone in water you can see the circular rings and how fast it moves and vanish the heavier the stone-> big circles and fast movements like epicentre” i was trying to explain the concept” ..

From Jeff Knight – http://www.linkedin.com/in/jeffknightnc
Connecting with new sales prospects, locating help on difficult problems, maintaining a “pulse” on your industry, and of course, establishing a support network well before you need it.
Another subtle value provided by Linkedin is the convenience and accessibility of the network information. As an executive of our company, I have spent the last 5 years turning around problem profit centers. Managing the projects, recruiting, marketing, and the systems development takes its toll on time, personal and otherwise. Many of my peers, working in similar situations, have made the same observation. We are all running hard to innovate and deploy, immersing ourselves in our businesses. Attending national seminars, trade shows, and other traditional networking events can become impossible for long periods.
Linkedin has provided a means of relief from the silo that the competitive business climate can create. It provides quick and easy access to a wealth of knowledge, packaged in very informative “personal profiles” and groups. I have had the benefit of making some great connections, obtaining real help, and most importantly being able to offer help to others. Access to Linkedin, from the hotel or wherever, can greatly expand your reach and widen your personal area of influence.
I was introduced to Linkedin by John O’Conner with Career Pro of Raleigh, NC. John has become a great resource to me and our corporation. I would also highly recommend “Networlding” by Melissa Giovagnoli and Jocelyn Carter-Miller. It provides great instruction on defining goals and developing plans, while leveraging social media, to yield personal success.

From Amanda Normine – http://www.linkedin.com/in/amandanormine
You may have a good job now, but having connections in the right places could bring you a better one down the line!!!
Many recruiters, like myself, only target people who are currently in the workforce… so you never know when that opportunity would knock on your door, should your door be visible!

From Joy Montgomery – http://www.linkedin.com/in/joymontgomery
Do you know an easier way to keep your network alive and well?

From Laurie Meisel – http://www.linkedin.com/in/lauriemeisel
I believe there is much to be learned just by looking at other people’s profiles!
Let’s say person “A” has been in their current position for 8 years and now person “B” comes along a recent grad who had the opportunity to prepare for the same field. While person “A” has the time on the job will s/he have the same range of skills?
Let’s say a lot of new tech has been introduced into the field if person “A’s company is not yet there, person “B” could be coming out of school with all of the latest skills ready to swoop in. Person “A” is no longer on the same playing field to make a career move (if they haven’t kept up on their own.) AND that person might not even know it, unless they LOOK and see what skills someone of the same position elsewhere is carrying. It can be quite eye opening!
So, why would YOU say that someone with a job should spend time with Linkedin? Or what did you learn from this post? If you find it useful share it with a friend!

From Jocelyn Oakman – http://www.linkedin.com/in/jocelynoakman
LinkedIn is like my “Poker Hand”. I don’t want to bet on my career with only 1 Ace (My current Position). LinkedIn is like the card dealer, and the connections I make are the deck of cards. Any one of, or combination of, my connections could win me my next big career success. That success could be in the form of increased business from referrals and advertising through my connections in my current career path, or it could mean landing a brand new career.
It has been proven over and over again that “Who You Know” can have a greater impact on your career than simply “What You Know”. LinkedIn helps maintain your visibility to your connections as you grow in “What You Know”, while at the same time updating you on how they are growing in their career success. This viral forum for an interchange of knowledge about business and opportunities is what makes LinkedIn such a powerful resource for all business professionals.

From Todd Thigpen – http://www.linkedin.com/in/toddthigpen
I believe networking to create constructive relationships is beneficial, whether employed or unemployed. For those unemployed without any strong network or experience being unemployment, one common attribute of networking I’ve observed is a sense of urgency or anxiousness that effects the conversation. The need for employment seems to bias the conversation. For those happily employed, this need doesn’t exist. I believe effective networking is about giving rather than receiving. Someone employed is in a better position to give. Hence, they can build constructive relationships that may benefit them in the future. LinkedIn provides a great forum for effective networking. Employed people should utilize LinkedIn.

From Martin Brossman – http://www.linkedin.com/in/martinbrossman
If you have a job and you are not taking some time to invest in good people outside your job you are just not taking care of your family or yourself. Why should people help you if you have made no effort to invest in them. Linkedin is one of the best free business resources to spend a little time each week to do this without having to spend a lot of money. I keep meeting people laid off who never thought it would happen to them an see the scared look in their eyes because they did noting to network until they were laid off. They are trying to network now and the need still exist but the effort required is many times greater. If you work with a good job placement person or career counselor you will still get better help if you bring a network with you. What have you done today to network with good people?

Why would YOU say that someone with a job should spend time with Linkedin? Or what did you learn from this post? If you find it useful share it with a friend!

Short URL to this post   http://tinyurl.com/linkedin4job

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A Unique Gift for Someone of Value in Your Past or Present – A Linkedin Recommendation

Posted by Martin Brossman on 12/19/2008

ChristmasGiftA Unique Gift for Someone of Value in Your Past or Present

Consider giving a gift for someone in your life that has made a difference in your life. Someone you currently know, have done business with, or just worked with. Someone maybe from 20 years ago that you admired, that stood out as exceptional in some way in your presence. Give them a gift that 30 million people can see. The gift of a recommendation in Linkedin.com –a professional networking site that costs nothing to join. A web site that lets you appreciate people in a way that may help them get a raise, promotions, a new job one day or close a deal for them by a client seeing it. To give a recommendation in Linkedin they need to be connected to you. I recommend these steps to follow:

1) Making an ongoing list of anyone from your past that you remember being outstanding or exceptional in your presence.

2) If it was important and your job was to say something honest about them in a group of people, what would you say? (If you are shy assume that shyness just went away like magic.) Then write your comment down.

3) Look them up in Linkedin and see if you can find them. If you can, see if you can get introduced to them, sharing the recommendation you would give them in the introduction. Tell the person or people who are passing on the recommendation that you found this person and that you want to connect to them so you can give them this recommendation.

3B) If you cannot find them on Linkedin, check Google.com with their name in quotes or check any directories you are aware of. Make the same offer in an email if possible. If you cannot find them at all, save the write up in a document with others and check back in the future.

4) After connecting to them, give them the recommendation. You may let them know that if they see anything they would like changed to let you know. You may have gotten some data wrong.

5) Do this activity engagingly, be authentic and honest about the way you know them. The more specific the better.

I guarantee this will enhance your life and your business! If you link to me on Linkedin make sure to reference this letter or how you know me in a personal note. Never use the blank form comment in Linedin. If they are not worth the time to write a personal sentence or two, you should not have them in your Linkedin group.

Share this posting: http://tinyurl.com/3jp5ay

Also see my instructions on giving a recommendation in Linkedin: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5izESU7oqI

Be Well,
Martin Brossman
Martin@CoachingSupport.com
Linkedin profile: http://www.linkedin.com/in/martinbrossman
Twitter Update’s: http://twitter.com/martinbrossman
www.ProNetworkingOnLine.com
www.CoachingSupport.com

See all the posting on this blog at (contributors welcome):
https://usinglinkedin.wordpress.com/

If you live in the RTP NC area also check out the local Linkedin resource: www.linkingraleighnc.com

Posted in Career, Career Uses, Job Hunting, Linkedin, Martin Brossman | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Martin Brossman – Interviewed with NBC17 about Job Hunting using Linkedin

Posted by Martin Brossman on 11/27/2008

NBC17 interview with Martin Brossman about Linkedin and Jobs

NBC17 interview with Martin Brossman about Linkedin and Jobs

An Interview with Martin Brossman on Using Linkedin as a Job Hunting tool. Also see other resources below.

Here is the two links to the shows:

1st the spot that was shown on the nightly news:
http://news.mync.com/site/news/video/2951/Linked%20In%20pkg/

2nd more of the interview:
http://news.mync.com/site/news/video/2944/Martin_Brossman_interview/

I want to thank all who recommended me for this show including Greg Hyer with the great RTP Linkedin resource: www.linkingraleighnc.com, Wayne Sutton and Chuck Hester (Linkedin Live, find Chuck at: http://www.linkedin.com/in/chuckhester). I know their were others that recommend me as well but did not get the names.

Other resources: Professional Networking On-Line (Article on MyNC.com) :
http://wake.mync.com/site/wake/Community/story/11074

Martin Brossman - Success Coach / Trainer

Martin Brossman - Success Coach / Trainer

About Martin Brossman

Martin, a success coach, speaker, trainer and author, has been mastering the art of networking in the Triangle since 1982 ( www.coachingsupport.com ). He has originated numerous successful in-person and on-line networking groups which have facilitated meaningful business connections among members. Martin’s computer skills have powered his keen ability to create and teach crucial new Internet communications, such as blogging, podcasting and on-line networking. His own podcast show can be heard at www.InquireOnLine.info . He offers consulting on how to generate profitable alliances by maximizing face-to-face and on-line presence and managing “the conversation of you” on the Web. Also see: www.ProNetworkingOnLine.com .

For more information, contact Martin Brossman at (919) 847-4757 or Martin@CoachingSupport.com
For TinyURL to share this page using: http://tinyurl.com/5lqyyl

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